Sam Abuelsamid


The Tech Guy #1563

This past week, Elon Musk said that the current version of Tesla autopilot can do fully self-driving on the high ways. But Sam says there isn’t a single car on the road, with the exception of test vehicles that are fully self-driving. The technology simply isn’t reliable enough without a safety driver. Leo says he can’t wait for it to happen because he would like to never have to drive again. Sam says that people’s perceptions of loving to drive are changing, preferring to have someone else do the driving. That’s why Uber and Lyft are becoming so successful.


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The Tech Guy #1561

Sam is back to talk about the difference between auto pilot driver assist and self driving calls. It’s fool hardy to assume that you can climb in the back to take a nap while your car drives itself. Cars aren’t completely automated yet and mostly, the self driving car needs human input from time to time. Most cars are a level 1 system which detects cars in front of you slowing down and slowing down your cruise control. A level 2 system has an auto pilot, but the driver needs to be engaged to take over control at any moment, and the system is designed to rely on that.


The Tech Guy #1557

Sam is back from CES and he says that while more companies are featuring technology for cars, it is by no means a huge car show. That’s the domain of the Detroit Auto Show. But Sam says that doesn’t mean that there wasn’t some cool car tech there. Alexa for Auto is becominng a thing. Sam says that cars are becoming far more computerized. Chips have been in cars since the 70s, but most cars now have about 75-100 separate computers built into them. We’re starting to see a trend towards fewer, more powerful computers that will run your car for you.

That leads to the issue of security in your car. The more connected your car is, the more a risk for your car to get hacked. Sam says that in many ways, Tesla has the advantage because it didn’t have to contend with legacy controllers and computers that have been in a design for years. They just built a main, centralized computer that manages the entire system, and gives you the option of resetting different systems without affecting the others. Do they have an operating system? Not really. They’re more dedicated chips that just run an command. But Linux is coming into cars now.


The Tech Guy #1555

This week, Sam is in Las Vegas for CES and he says it’s rapidly become the largest auto show in the world. The north hall is crammed with auto tech now. Everything from car audio, to smart assistant enabled technology for cars, to smart cars. But the big change over the last fear years is how the aftermarket head units and stereos have disappeared, as people are streaming from their phones. Leo says that makes sense because your phone will be updated and that stereo won’t.


2019 Jaguar i-Pace

In my formative years as a car enthusiast, having any kind of affection for British cars was fraught with peril. While many of them were attractive and enormously fun to drive, they also had a well-deserved reputation for unreliability. As often as not, the source of a failure to move could be traced back to electrical gremlins. After what seemed like an interminable wait, I finally had the opportunity to get behind the wheel of the all-new all-electric Jaguar i-Pace to see if it could live up to the hype and not let me down.

Read the full review at Forbes 


2019 Volvo XC40 – The New Small Swede With Surprising Value

2019 Volvo XC40 T5 AWD Momentum

The first-phase of the ground up revamp of the entire Volvo product portfolio is nearing completion. Like most brands, Volvo has shifted heavily toward utility vehicles such as the midsize and large XC60 and XC90 as well as the slightly higher riding car variants like the V90 Cross-country. This year Volvo finally has an entry in the fast growing compact utility segment as well with the new XC40 and it has a lot to recommend it.

Read the full review over on Forbes